Welcome To Year One

Here you can find a collection of useful websites for our Year one children. We will also be posting the Learning Log Projects for you to complete.

Year 1 Learning Log projects

Your challenge is do two of the following activities each week, but of course you can do more if you want to!

You decide how to present it in your Learning Log, and remember you can use more than 1 page for each project.

If you’d like to complete more tasks in this time, you absolutely can!

Summer 2

Week Beginning 1st June

Show me anything you want to about BOOKS and READING!

Your challenge is do two of the following activities this week, but of course you can do more if you want to! These are only suggestions, so if you can think of another way to show your learning, that would be fantastic too!

Remember to send your photos to [email protected]

  • as readers read a book in an unusual place
  • as readers make a book den where you can hide away and read books in peace 
  • as readers read a book with all of the people in your house (can you get your pets in the photo too?)
  • as writers write book reviews or new blurbs for your favourite books
  • as writers write your own story or non-fiction book
  • as writers find out all about your favourite author and write a biography or lists of facts about them
  • as scientists sort and classify your books into fiction/non-fiction, ones you like/dislike, by colour, by author, in alphabetical order
  • as artists design and make new book covers for your books
  • as designers create a meal that represents a book (as inspired by the Great British Menu on TV)
  • as geographers read travel guides about other countries
  • as historians make your own mini book
Week Beginning 8th June

Show me anything you want about ART and ARTISTS!

Your challenge is do two of the following activities this week, but of course you can do more if you want to! These are only suggestions, so if you can think of another way to show your learning, that would be fantastic too!

Remember to send your photos to [email protected]

  • as artists use different media to make your own pictures – such as crayons, paints, felt tips on paper – or you could even use chalk or water on the pavements outside
  • as artists use craft materials to make birthday cards for friends or family members
  • as artists be inspired by real artists to make pictures similar to theirs 
  • as artists take part in online lessons with Rob Biddulph and draw some of his characters 
  • as designers look at pictures of sculptures (such as The Angel of the North, the Birmingham Bull, Superlambanana, Stonehenge, the Easter Island heads) and try to recreate these using playdough or construction toys
  • as writers assemble your own art gallery at home and make a leaflet which tells your family about each picture
  • as readers read story books and study the illustrations (I especially like Axel Scheffler’s pictures, who illustrates many of Julia Donaldson’s books)
  • as historians find out about artists such as Van Gogh
  • as scientists experiment by mixing different paints together to see what colours you can make, or you can combine natural materials (such as flowers and leaves) to try to make your own painting materials
Week Beginning 15th June

Show me anything you want about SCIENCE and SCIENTISTS!

Your challenge is do two of the following activities this week, but of course you can do more if you want to! These are only suggestions, so if you can think of another way to show your learning, that would be fantastic too!

Remember to send your photos to [email protected]

  • as readers have a go at decoding really long dinosaur names such as Astrodon, Oviraptor, Spinosaurus, Raptorex, Supersaurus or Vulcanodon.
  • as readers read the story of Mary Anning 
  • as writers make a fact sheet about the scientist Mary Anning
  • as writers make some Top-Trumps style cards about dinosaurs
  • as artists decorate an old sock and make your own sockasaurus puppet 
  • as designers invent a new environment where dinosaurs could live today. You could make it too, using a paper plate and natural materials
  • as scientists sort pictures of dinosaurs into carnivores, herbivores and omnivores. A Venn diagram would be good for this task
  • as scientists take chocolate chips out of a chocolate chip cookie using just a cocktail stick/toothpick, just like palaeontologists excavating dinosaur bones
  • as scientists develop your own theories about why dinosaurs became extinct
  • as mathematicians measure to see which dinosaurs could fit in your garden

as musicians write your own “Baby Shark” song based on dinosaurs   

Week Beginning 22nd June

Show me anything you want about PE and KEEPING HEALTHY!

Your challenge is do two of the following activities this week, but of course you can do more if you want to! These are only suggestions, so if you can think of another way to show your learning, that would be fantastic too!

Remember to send your photos to [email protected]


  • as athletes join in with a Joe Wicks exercise session at 9am on YouTube.
  • as athletes make up your own Joe Wick style exercise session, show your family and make sure they join in (write down your exercise routine)
  • as athletes give yourself a challenge that you can practise every day to see if you can improve during the week (for example: how fast can you run 5 laps of your garden? how many keepie uppies can you do? how many times can you get a ball in a basket in 5 minutes?)
  • as designers plan and set up an obstacle course in the garden to help you keep fit (maybe your brothers and sisters can have a go too)
  • as designers find out about healthy foods and make a healthy and an unhealthy lunchbox
  • as cooks help your family to cook a healthy dinner and work out which parts of your body are being looked after (e.g. carrots for good eyesight, breakfast cereals for healthy blood)
  • as writers find out about your favourite footballer or athlete and write a non-fiction page about them
  • as geographers find out all about dance traditions in other cultures. Can you make up some of your own? Don’t forget to add costumes too!

as historians find out some fun facts about the Olympic Games

Week Beginning 29th June

Show me anything you want to about RE and CHURCH!

Your challenge is do two of the following activities this week, but of course you can do more if you want to! These are only suggestions, so if you can think of another way to show your learning, that would be fantastic too!

Remember to send your photos to [email protected]


  • as readers read some of your favourite stories from the Bible
  • as writers write some asking, thanking, praising and sorry prayers
  • as writers pretend we need a new priest at St Augustine’s and write a job description. What does a priest need to be and what does he need to do?
  • as designers draw some new robes from Father Tom to wear during Mass. What important Christian symbols will you choose to include on them?
  • as designers draw a plan for the inside of a church. What do you need to include? Remember to label everything that should be in a church.
  • as designers make a church out of recycled materials or construction toys
  • as artists make a new stained glass window for St Augustine’s church. What story from the Bible will you use as your inspiration?
  • as good friends read and discuss these scenarios with your family.  What would they do? What would you do?
  • as Christians share the story of the Good Samaritan with your family then do good deeds for each other. Who can be most like the Good Samaritan?
  • as musicians listen and sing along to your favourite church songs “Our God is here”  “Take Our Bread We Ask YouHere I Am Lord” 
Week Beginning 6th July

Show me anything you want to about HISTORY and THE PAST!

Your challenge is do two of the following activities this week, but of course you can do more if you want to! These are only suggestions, so if you can think of another way to show your learning, that would be fantastic too!

Remember to send your photos to [email protected]

  • as historians make a timeline of your own life, including photos if you can
  • as historians find out about and draw your own family tree if you didn’t make one when this was suggested previously
  • as historians find out about how bikes have changed over the years
  • as listeners talk to your older relatives (parents and grandparents) about what their homes and schools were like when they were young, and make comparisons about how things are still the same or different now
  • as listeners ask your older relatives about big events that happened in the world before you were born (for example: the Queen’s Silver Jubilee in 1977, the Challenger space disaster in 1986, the London Olympics in 2012, but please don’t ask them to remember the Great Fire of London in 1666!)
  • as writers write a recount of your favourite ever day – maybe a birthday, a holiday, a wedding, when your younger brother or sister was born
  • as writers find out about our Queen and write a fact sheet about her
  • as artists draw your own version of a timber-framed Tudor house
  • as designers plan and make a time machine (use your imagination!)
  • as designers build your own castle with construction toys
  • as geographers find out how people travelled around the world over time
  • as a programmer revise the Great Fire of London Minecraft Experience
Week Beginning 13th July

Show me anything you want about GEOGRAPHY and OUR WORLD!

Your challenge is do two of the following activities this week, but of course you can do more if you want to! These are only suggestions, so if you can think of another way to show your learning, that would be fantastic too!

Remember to send your photos to [email protected]

  • as geographers study atlases, maps or globes and identify different countries and oceans, hot and cold places etc
  • as geographers make a map of your local area using symbols to show things like trees, streams, benches, roads, shops, houses
  • as readers find about other countries in our world
  • as listeners ask your family questions about places they have visited or talk to family members who live elsewhere and ask about their town or country
  • as writers write a recount about a holiday you have been on. Where did you go? What did you do? What was the weather like?
  • as writers use your imagination about what life would be like living in either a very cold country or a very hot country and tell me all about it
  • as writers make a fact sheet about an explorer like Christopher Columbus or Neil Armstrong 
  • as mathematicians look at signs on your daily walks. What numbers did you spot? Identify the biggest and smallest numbers and put them in order
  • as designers make a holiday scene for your dolls or teddies to enjoy
  • as designers design and make your own school from recycled materials
  • as designers use construction toys to make models of new play equipment for your local park. Can you include moveable parts?

Summer 1

Week Beginning 27th April

As Scientists

Make friends with a tree!  Find a tree in your garden or on your daily walk. Circle it with your arms, smell it, touch the bark and take a close look at the branches and leaves. Make rubbings of the bark, collect a few of the leaves and take photographs.

 

As Artists

Draw a picture of a tree, Sketch it using your pencil in different ways, taking your time and making sure the size of the tree is in perspective. Add colour to your sketch, ensuring you use the correct colours. You can use crayons, felt tips, paints, whatever you would like to use.

 

As Mathematicians

Measure how wide the trunk of a tree is using non-standard units such as your hands, sheets of A4 paper, or string and wool. Measure the string or wool you used and work out how old the tree is (about 2.5cm of a tree’s girth is equal to one year’s growth) Can you work out what year was it planted?

 

As Scientists

Remember in the Autumn Term we learned that some trees are deciduous and some are evergreen. Look in your garden or on your daily walk around your local area and describe the trees you can see – are they deciduous or evergreen? Pick up some leaves to look closely at them when you get home. Can you find out what sort of tree they came from?

Use this website – Twinkl Leaf Identification

Sort them into deciduous and evergreen leaves and you could draw round them or stick them in your learning log.

 

As Geographers

Draw a map of your garden or your local park or your local area. Remember to include the paths, trees, plants, buildings, fences and other things you can see. Use your imagination – can you change your map into a treasure map? Give your family clues about where the treasure might be buried.

 

As Artists

Make a wacky and wonderful tree boggart! A tree boggart is a face sculpted on the surface of the tree bark. Press clay/plasticine/playdough onto a tree trunk and sculpt a face into it using sticks, twigs, leave, stones and bark. Take a photograph or draw your tree boggart, labelling what you used to make the boggart’s face.

Here are some ideas: Wellford School

As Historians

Draw your own family tree. A family tree is a diagram showing the relationship between people in several generations of a family. Here is the Queen’s family tree: Twinkl – Family Tree  so now you can make one of your own.

Week Beginning 4th May

As Environmentalists

Feed the birds in your garden! Visit these websites to make a fat cake  or a bird feeder.

Hang it from a tree in your garden for the birds to enjoy. Show me how you made it by sending a photo to:

[email protected]

 As Mathematicians

Sit in a quiet area of your garden and watch the birds. If you have any binoculars, these might help you watch the birds more closely. What sort of birds did you spot? Use this Garden Birds Sighting Checklist

Keep a tally chart of how many of each sort you see. How many birds did you see in total? Maybe you could show your results using a pictogram or block graph.

 

As Artists

Draw a bird you have seen, making sure you use the right colours. Find out all about this bird; what is it called? Where does it make a nest? What does it like to eat? What does it sound like? Does it fly away to a hot country in the winter or does it stay in Britain?

 

As Designers

Watch this video to study nests. Do you know what makes a good nest? It is bound together tightly, it doesn’t fall out of a tree, it is warm, it protects the eggs, it is strong enough for mother bird to sit on and it lets water through it. Can you work out what make a poor nest? Make a nest using pipe-cleaners, string, bits of paper, sticks, twigs and other collected items from the outdoors. Tell me how you made it and what materials you used. Spend time playing with your nests. Experiment by placing an egg inside (it could be a plastic egg!) to see it fits. Don’t forget to evaluate your nest: did you make a successful nest or would you need to change anything if you did this task again?

 

As Cooks

Make chocolate cornflake nests to share with your family. Here is an example recipe:

Easter Egg Nests

But you can use different cereals (shredded wheat or rice krispies) or experiment to see what else might stick your nests together. Enjoy eating them too!

Week Beginning 11th May

As Christians

Read the story of Noah’s Ark or watch it here Re-enact it with your toy animals, making sure they go in two by two! Maybe you could make an ark out of Lego (or other construction toys) for the animals to go in. Can you use your knowledge of the two times table to count the animals in twos to find out how many are in your ark?

 

As Designers

Make a dove, like the one who flew from the Ark. You could use paper, card or a paper plate. A dove is a sign of peace. Talk to your family about what peace is. Hang up your dove to remind you to pray to peace in God’s world.  

 

As Mathematicians

I’m sure you have already made a rainbow and put it up in your window (if you haven’t, you could make one now you know the story of Noah’s Ark, and that a rainbow is a sign of the promise God made.) On one of your daily walks, count the number of rainbows you see. Tell your family which is your favourite. Do you all like the same one? My favourite one in my neighbourhood says “When it rains look for rainbows, when it’s dark look for stars.”    

 

 

As Artists

Draw pictures of some of the animals who went into Noah’s Ark on little squares of paper. You need to draw two of each animal on different squares. Use these pictures to play a game of pairs with your family. I wonder who will win!

As Communicators

Play a ‘Who am I?’ game with your family. ‘Who am I?’ is a fun way to learn more about animals: attach the name or a picture of an animal to each other’s backs. Everyone must then ask probing questions to discover which animal they are! Questions could include: where do I live? (desert, water, house, woodland) what do I live in? (kennel, pond, nest) how do I move? (fly, walk, swim) how many legs do I have? (2, 4, 8)

 

As Scientists

Make your own ark using recycled materials. What will your ark need to be? (waterproof, lightweight, no holes, able to float) What materials will it be best to use? How will you fix all of the parts together? Test it in the sink or bath. Did it work? If not, what changes will you need to make so it will float? Will it still work, even if you put some of Noah’s animals on the boat? Have fun! 

 

Week Beginning 18th May

As Readers

Read the story of Jack and the Beanstalk (look here if you don’t have your own version) and retell the story to your family. You could make your own puppets and scenery or draw a doodle/story map (like we do in school) Maybe you could use your imagination and change the items Jack takes from the giant, or change the characters, or change

 

As Scientists

Plant a seed, bulb or pip in a pot or in your garden. Look after it. What do seeds need to grow?  Keep a seed diary as you watch it grow, drawing pictures or taking photos of every stage of your plant’s growth (this process will take longer than a week, so you can continue your seed diary into next week and beyond.)

 

As Scientists

Draw a plant, such as a sunflower, and label all of its parts. This video will help you, and there is even a fun quiz to do that the end! 

 

As Scientists

Watch BBC Bitesize to find out all about the different stages of a plant. Draw and label a lifecycle of a plant

 

As Artists

Make your own woodland crowns! Look around your garden, or while out on your daily work, find some natural materials such as leaves or sticks. Draw around flower, fruit, seed and leaf templates then paint them and cut them out. Stick them carefully to a card band or crown adding twigs, acorns, and other woodland treasures. You could write a set of instructions so I know how to make a crown just like yours!

Interesting Websites

Oak National Academy

Oak National Academy is a new collection of high-quality lessons and online resources. Backed by the Government, it has been created in response to the coronavirus lockdown.

 Visit the website

Country Living

Do you want to learn more about animals, then check out these fantastic live animal cams which let you get up close to some amazing creatures all from the safety of home.

 Visit the website

Bitesize

Year 1 lessons for different subjects in the curriculum.

 Visit the website

Jackanory Junior

Storytelling for younger viewers, using videos and audio.

 Visit the website

Sir Linkalot

Sir Linkalot is on a quest to make ”I can’t spell” a thing of the past. Helping students of any age with spelling, punctuation, and grammar based on linking (SPAGBOL). 

 Visit the website

Oliver Jeffers

For all of you stuck at home in the coming weeks, I will be reading one of my books every weekday. Let’s be bored together.

  Visit the website

Hungry Little Minds

Simple, fun activities for kids, from newborn to five. 

 Visit the website

The Gruffolo

Explore the deep dark wood where there are animals to spot and fun games to find. There are songs to listen to and join in with and so much.

 Visit the website